Netflix gets 'The Hunger Games,' Amazon snags Scripps Networks

Content competition continues apace for leading video streaming providers
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The competition for content continues to foment between old-timer Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) and newcomer Amazon Prime (Nasdaq: AMZN) Instant Video service.

Amazon announced that it will be adding "back catalog content" from Scripps Networks that involves "hundreds" of episodes of past seasons from a lineup of channels including HGTV, DIY Network, Food Network, Cooking Channel and Travel Channel. Netflix answered that it will be the first to offer The Hunger Games on streaming video in the U.K. and Ireland.

Both deals are riddled with non-exclusive elements that somewhat dampen their value. For instance, Scripps has licensed its content via an a la carte agreement with Hulu. Amazon one-ups that, though, by making the content available via a subscription service, the e-commerce giant told TechCrunch.

For Scripps, the deal is just part of an overall plan to "make our valued lifestyle content accessible to consumers wherever and whenever they want," Henry Ahn, executive vice president of content distribution and marketing for Scripps Networks Interactive, said in the TechCrunch story. "Licensing content from our extensive library to Amazon provides our millions of avid fans with yet another opportunity to engage with our entertaining and informative content."

Scripps also acknowledged the cross-selling opportunity that comes with Amazon's e-tailer expertise.

"The Amazon platform is a great complement to our branded products such as books, cookware, furniture and accessories, lighting and more," he added.

Netflix isn't exclusive either, but it does have the jump on the competition, according to a story in The Next Web. Others may eventually show the movie--although Netflix will have it first--and Blinkbox is already making it available on a pay-per-film basis.

For more:
TechCrunch has this story
The Next Web has this story

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