Latest Commentary

IBC 2014 wrap: Content rights loom large as multiscreen moves to the forefront

IBC, arguably the Continent's biggest broadcasting and media conference, can be a bit dizzying. Going over notes in the wake of a five-day whirlwind of conference sessions, meetings and networking events is a somewhat herculean task. But paging through two notebooks' worth of material revealed a few underlying trends at this year's event.

No longer hunting for a 'Netflix killer,' broadcasters, MSOs trend toward integration

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. As we've noted recently, over-the-top providers like Hulu and Netflix are no longer stealing a march on traditional distributors. Broadcasters like CBS, cable operators, channels like A+E Networks and others are finally making multiscreen a bigger priority--as long as the technology fits within their current moneymaking model.

Amazon's key to profitability in Twitch acquisition

Amazon's $970 million acquisition of Twitch is one of the most talked-about business deals this summer. How Amazon swooped in and nabbed the live-streaming service after months of talks with Google faltered, and more importantly, why the retail giant bought Twitch, is generating plenty of comment. Much of it is outright confusion.

PlayStation TV, Android TV crowd into streaming-device market

The streaming-device market is looking pretty saturated right now, but there are still more device announcements to come. Sony said it will debut its PlayStation TV device on Oct. 14 in North America. And Google is still working on its Android TV platform, which will run on smart TVs--it hasn't announced a release date yet. But according to analysts, neither of these products is going to shake up the streaming market.

Metadata gives closed captioning new utility

How accessible is online video to the hearing-impaired and those who speak other languages? Thanks to developing technologies, it's getting better all the time--something we explore in today's feature on closed captioning. We take a look at some of today's closed captioning providers, including startups challenging the captioning status quo.

In battle for the Internet, Aereo sinks, FilmOn shrugs, net neutrality holds fast

As predicted, this year has been a contentious one for both online video and the Internet. Aereo tested a new way to deliver broadcast content, and lost. ISPs and online video providers, meantime, struggle with meeting the demand for OTT content.

World Cup's record-setting peaks, minor disappointments set stage for online sports future

The World Cup didn't just shatter streaming records. It blew through analyst expectations that this would be the year for live sports online.

Online video's course after Aereo

This week in online video was almost all about Aereo. Almost. In the midst of a disappointing ruling by the Supreme Court that may put the streaming provider out of business, a little thing called the World Cup caught Americans' attention.

The perils of Netflix

Netflix is sitting on top of the online video hill right now, but a host of challengers threaten to knock it off. From growing competition to bandwidth pressures to disgruntled shareholders looking for a leadership change, the path ahead holds many dangers.

Amazon, Netflix spend billions in content race, but competitors like YouTube are sneaking up

Today, I'm taking a stab at how much three major online video providers--Amazon, Netflix and Hulu--are spending to acquire existing content and produce original content. It's not as easy a task as some imagine, because only Netflix, to keep its investors happy, is really open about its specific content spending habits.